Philosophy in the Matrix movies: what's the relationship (if any) with BK's Analytic Idealism and/or Consciousness?

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PHIbonacci
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Philosophy in the Matrix movies: what's the relationship (if any) with BK's Analytic Idealism and/or Consciousness?

Post by PHIbonacci »



Now that Matrix 4 (Resurrections) is about to be released (December 22th), this might be a huge opportunity to introduce BK's idealism to the world.

According to Wikipedia:

Philosopher William Irwin suggests that the idea of the "Matrix" – a generated reality invented by malicious machines – is an allusion to Descartes' "First Meditation", and his idea of an evil demon. The Meditation hypothesizes that the perceived world might be a comprehensive illusion created to deceive us. The same premise can be found in Hilary Putnam's brain in a vat scenario proposed in the 1980s. A connection between the premise of The Matrix and Plato's Allegory of the Cave has also been suggested. The allegory is related to Plato's theory of Forms, which holds that the true essence of an object is not what we perceive with our senses, but rather its quality, and that most people perceive only the shadow of the object and are thus limited to false perception.

The philosophy of Immanuel Kant has also been claimed as another influence on the film, and in particular how individuals within the Matrix interact with one another and with the system. Kant states in his Critique of Pure Reason that people come to know and explore our world through synthetic means (language, etc.), and thus this makes it rather difficult to discern truth from falsely perceived views. This means people are their own agents of deceit, and so in order for them to know truth, they must choose to openly pursue truth.

This idea can be examined in Agent Smith's monologue about the first version of the Matrix, which was designed as a human utopia, a perfect world without suffering and with total happiness. Agent Smith explains that, "it was a disaster. No one accepted the program. Entire crops [of people] were lost."


What do you think?
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AshvinP
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Re: Philosophy in the Matrix movies: what's the relationship (if any) with BK's Analytic Idealism and/or Consciousness?

Post by AshvinP »

PHIbonacci wrote: Sun Sep 26, 2021 3:45 pm Now that Matrix 4 (Resurrections) is about to be released (December 22th), this might be a huge opportunity to introduce BK's idealism to the world.

According to Wikipedia:

Philosopher William Irwin suggests that the idea of the "Matrix" – a generated reality invented by malicious machines – is an allusion to Descartes' "First Meditation", and his idea of an evil demon. The Meditation hypothesizes that the perceived world might be a comprehensive illusion created to deceive us. The same premise can be found in Hilary Putnam's brain in a vat scenario proposed in the 1980s. A connection between the premise of The Matrix and Plato's Allegory of the Cave has also been suggested. The allegory is related to Plato's theory of Forms, which holds that the true essence of an object is not what we perceive with our senses, but rather its quality, and that most people perceive only the shadow of the object and are thus limited to false perception.

The philosophy of Immanuel Kant has also been claimed as another influence on the film, and in particular how individuals within the Matrix interact with one another and with the system. Kant states in his Critique of Pure Reason that people come to know and explore our world through synthetic means (language, etc.), and thus this makes it rather difficult to discern truth from falsely perceived views. This means people are their own agents of deceit, and so in order for them to know truth, they must choose to openly pursue truth.

This idea can be examined in Agent Smith's monologue about the first version of the Matrix, which was designed as a human utopia, a perfect world without suffering and with total happiness. Agent Smith explains that, "it was a disaster. No one accepted the program. Entire crops [of people] were lost."


What do you think?

All sci-fi, fantasy, and horror films (actually all stories in general, but these genres of film make the connection most clear), especially if they capture the Imagination in any way, and present what feels to be "original" or "innovative" ideas, are abstract distillations of archetypal spiritual activity which constitutes our daily experience. It is the same archetypal spiritual activity which gave rise to all ancient mythology and philosophy and modern philosophy-science. So the real lessons are not to be learned by comparing the movie themes and images to philosophies, but to the underlying spiritual forces which gave rise to them both and which are immanently present in our experience. The 'physical' sense-world we perceive, for ex., is quite literally a symbolic expression of these supersensible activities, and that is the core idea of the Matrix which really captures the Imagination because it rings so deeply true. Personally, I love watching all the great movies related to "time travel" and discerning how they capture the ways in which our own past and future spiritual activity manifests itself in the present ("our own" when we understand all be-ings to be evolving manifestations of the same Spirit-Soul). The best I have come across so far is "Arrival" by Dennis Villenueve, in terms of both ideal content and execution.


“I began to understand that the goal of psychic development is the Self. There is no linear evolution; there is only a circumambulation of the Self."
- Jung
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